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"Amillennialism 101" -- Audio and On-Line Resources

 

Living in Light of Two Ages

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Monday
Dec142015

This Week at Christ Reformed Church (December 14-20)

Sunday Morning, December 20:  We continue with our Advent/Christmas series from the opening chapter of Luke's Gospel.  This week we will consider "Mary's Song" from Luke 1:39-56.  Our worship service begins at 10:30 a.m.

Sunday Afternoon:  We take up Lord's Day 6 in our series on the Heidelberg Catechism and the question of why our redeemer must be true God and sinless man. Our catechism service begins @ 1:15 p.m.

Wednesday Night Bible Study:  Resumes in January 2016, Lord willing, as we take up Paul's two Thessalonian letters

The Academy:  On Hiatus (TBA)

For More Information on Christ Reformed Church you can always find us here (Christ Reformed Info), or on Facebook (Christ Reformed on Facebook).

Sunday
Dec132015

"The Son of God" -- Luke 1:26-38

Here's the audio from this morning's sermon, the second in a series for Advent

Click Here

Sunday
Dec132015

This Week's White Horse Inn

The Lamb of God (Part 2)

On this program we are continuing our discussion concerning what it means for Jesus to be the Lamb of God. Once again Nancy Guthrie joins our roundtable discussion. Nancy is a teacher and the author of several books including Holding On to Hope: A Pathway through Suffering to the Heart of God, Be Still, My Soul: Embracing God's Purpose and Provision in Suffering, and a five-volume series entitled Seeing Jesus in the Old Testament.

The hosts sit down with Nancy Guthrie before a live audience in order to further unpack the themes she outlined in her conference address relating to Jesus’ role as the ultimate and final sacrifice for sin. During this roundtable discussion, the hosts also offer explanations as to why this central theme is ignored or downplayed in many contemporary churches. Join us for this special conference edition of the White Horse Inn.

Click Here

Thursday
Dec102015

Watch Where You Are Going

True baseball fans keep their eyes on MLB's annual winter meetings, because this is where your favorite team makes trades and signs free agents. 

The most memorable moment in these meetings occurred a few years back in Dallas, when a guest in the hotel/conference center where the meetings were being held was watching the cameras and the live broadcast in the lobby and was not paying attention to where he was going.  The result--the most often replayed clip on the MLB channel.

Wednesday
Dec092015

Finally, Someone in the Senate Makes Sense of the Struggle with ISIS!

Another "must see" video?  Yup, trust me, this is worth every seventeen minutes of your time.  Although he is among the youngest in the Senate, Ben Sasse is the adult in the Senate chamber.

Watch this!

Tuesday
Dec082015

"It Was About the Sixth Hour" -- John 19:1-16a

The Fifty-Eighth in a Series of Sermons on the Gospel of John

Who would have ever thought that one of the most significant events in human history would play out in a Roman military headquarters in Jerusalem, in a trial presided over by a man (the Roman governor, Pontius Pilate) who is at first curious about Jesus’ presence before him, then convinced of Jesus’ innocence, then angered by Jesus’ accusers (the Jews) who refuse to take “yes” for an answer, and then as the drama unfolds, becomes increasingly worried that he is being drawn into something much greater than he first thought, and who then does everything in his power to put an end to the spectacle this trial has become, before finally giving in to the Jews, ordering the death of Jesus by crucifixion.  It has been said that the Lord works in mysterious ways.  Surely, Jesus’ trial before Pilate is one of the most mysterious!  

There is no question that Jesus’ appearance before Pontius Pilate is one of the most dramatic scenes in the whole of the New Testament.  Pilate wants nothing more than to get through another Passover without incident.  He knows nothing and cares less about Jewish theology.  He is aware of the constant infighting between the various Jewish factions–the ongoing feud between the Pharisees (the theological conservatives) and the Sadducees (the theological liberals).  Pilate knows the Jews do not trust him, nor like him, and that they long for the day when they are free from Roman occupation.  He also knows that when the Jews bring Jesus before him on the morning of the Passover (the Jews most sacred holy day) something much more than meets the eye is going on behind the scenes.  What could this man Jesus have possibly done to upset the Jews so greatly?

As we make our way through the Gospel of John, we have come to the Passion Narrative (chapters 18-21 in John’s Gospel).  So far in these chapters, John has recounted Jesus’ betrayal by Judas (one of his own disciples), Jesus’ arrest in Gethsemane (where Jesus had gone to pray with his disciples after celebrating the Passover together), Jesus’ interrogation by Annas (the high-priest emeritus, who ignored the rules of Jewish legal procedure to personally question Jesus about his disciples and his teaching), before Jesus was turned over to Caiaphas for trial (Annas’ son-in-law, and the current high priest).  John also tells us that three times, Peter denied knowing Jesus, and that after the third time he denied his Lord, a rooster crowed, exactly as Jesus had foretold in the upper room earlier that same evening.

Although the synoptic gospels go into great detail about Jesus’ trial before the Sanhedrin–informing us that Jesus was unanimously convicted without any evidence against him, and that the Sanhedrin formally ratified the verdict from Jesus’ trial before Caiaphas early on Friday morning–John skips over these events.  John simply tells us that Annas bound Jesus over to Caiaphas, who, in turn, handed Jesus over to Pilate, which sets up the dramatic scene we covered last time in John 18:28-40, with Jesus (who is Israel’s Messiah and the true heir to David’s throne) standing before the same Gentile pagan who had offended much of Israel by insisted upon posting Roman legion banners throughout Jerusalem which identified Caesar Tiberias as a god.  Only the mysterious providence of God could have brought Pilate and Jesus together, with Pilate seemingly holding Jesus’ fate in his own hands.

To read the rest of this sermon, Click Here

Monday
Dec072015

This Week at Christ Reformed Church (December 7-13)

Sunday Morning, December 13:  We are continuing our four week Advent-Christmas series covering the opening chapter of Luke's Gospel.  In our second sermon, we are considering the Angel Gabriel's announcement to Mary from Luke 1:26-38.  Our worship service begins at 10:30 a.m.

Sunday Afternoon: We are working our way through Lord's Day 5 of the Heidelberg Catechism (the section on grace), and will be discussing Q & A 12-15.  Our catechism service begins @ 1:15 p.m.

Wednesday Night Bible Study, December 9:  We continue our study of Galatians and the fruit of the flesh/fruit of the Spirit contrast in Galatians 5. 

The Academy:  On Hiatus (TBA)

For More Information on Christ Reformed Church you can always find us here (Christ Reformed Info), or on Facebook (Christ Reformed on Facebook).

Sunday
Dec062015

"To Take Away My Reproach" -- Luke 1:1-25

Here's the audio from this morning's sermon on Luke 1:1-25 and the Angel Gabriel's announcement to Zechariah, Click Here

Sunday
Dec062015

This Week's White Horse Inn

The Lamb of God

As we continue our series on the person of Jesus Christ, we are taking a look at what it means for Jesus to be the Lamb of God. To help us understand this important image of salvation, Nancy Guthrie joins us once again. Nancy is a teacher and the author of several books including Holding On to Hope: A Pathway through Suffering to the Heart of God, Be Still, My Soul: Embracing God's Purpose and Provision in Suffering, and a five-volume series entitled Seeing Jesus in the Old Testament.

On this special edition, we are airing an address by Nancy Guthrie from our White Horse Inn conference, Who Is Jesus? In this presentation, Nancy traces the theme of sacrifice and substitution from the early chapters of Genesis to the book of Revelation, showing along the way that Jesus’s primary mission was to be the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world. Join us for this special edition of the White Horse Inn.

Click Here

Tuesday
Dec012015

"My Kingdom Is Not from the World" -- John 18:28-40

The Fifty-Seventh in a Series of Sermons on the Gospel of John

The Jews have found Jesus guilty of a capitol crime–blasphemy.  The sentence for such a crime is death.  The high priest, Caiaphas, and those who were present for Jesus’ trial in the high priest’s courtyard, then brought Jesus before the full Sanhedrin where the verdict was ratified.  Unwilling to take the next step of executing Jesus by stoning, the Jews deliver Jesus over to Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor.  Jesus’ appearance before Pilate is not only dramatic–a Jewish Messiah being questioned by a pagan Gentile governor–it reveals two remarkable things.  The first is that Pilate was not about to let the man standing before him create trouble for Rome–a man who despite his reputation as a miracle worker, now stood before Pilate bound, beaten, and bloodied.  Jesus was hardly an impressive figure, a man much smaller than his reputation.  The second revelation is that the moment it was clear that Jesus was not interested in leading an insurrection against Rome, many of the people in Israel turned against him, and chanted for the release of a notorious criminal (Barabbas), while demanding that Jesus be put to death.  On the previous Sunday, Jesus was a conquering king.  On Friday morning, Jesus is a condemned man.  Such is the mysterious nature of God’s redemptive purposes.

As we work our way through the Gospel of John, we have come to the Passion Narrative which brings John’s Gospel to a close.  The last four chapters of John (18-21) describe Jesus’ betrayal and arrest, his trial before Annas (the high priest) and then Pilate (the Roman governor).  Jesus will be crucified by the Romans on the afternoon of the Passover, and then buried before Sundown on Friday.  Jesus will remain in the tomb for three days before his bodily resurrection on Sunday (Easter).  John has emphasized that throughout this astonishing turn of events, Jesus does all of this in obedience to the Father’s will so as to accomplish the salvation of all those given him by the Father, and for whom he is about to die.

As we saw last time, Judas betrayed Jesus by leaving the Passover meal early and then meeting the with members of the Sanhedrin (probably including the former high priest, Annas, and the current high priest, Annas’ son-in-law, Caiaphas).  Judas, no doubt, informed them that after the Passover meal Jesus and his disciples would gather for prayer in Gethsemane, a walled garden on the slopes of the Mount of Olives.  Leading an arrest mob which included Roman soldiers, members of the temple guard and certain members of the Sanhedrin, Judas directed them to Jesus’ location.  Bent on arresting Jesus and then trying him for capitol crimes (death penalty) the mob approached the garden late at night with lanterns, torches, and weapons.  These men were afraid that Jesus would resist them, perhaps to the point of exercising his miraculous powers.  But Jesus does not resist them.  Jesus is not taken by force, nor is he taken against his will.  Jesus must willingly undergo this shame and humiliation so as to be obedient unto death, so as to secure for us our salvation from sin.  And so Jesus voluntarily surrenders.

One of the things most difficult about preaching through John’s Passion narrative is that John includes a number details which are not found in the synoptic gospels, while at the same time omitting certain details found in the other three gospels.  John’s account of Jesus’ arrest and trial (John was very likely an eyewitness to many of the events unique to his gospel) includes Jesus’ appearance before Annas, before Jesus was turned over to Caiaphas (the current high priest) for trial.  Annas was the high priest emeritus and was well respected by the Jews, but had been deposed from office of high priest by the Romans in AD 15.  He questions Jesus about his disciples and his teaching, before the trial conducted by Caiaphas in the presence of the Sanhedrin begins in the same location–the courtyard of the high priest. 

To read the rest of this sermon, Click Here

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